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20121006
20121014
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CSPAN2 33
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English 33
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 7:00am EDT
has not been resolved but we are doing more teaching about religion today. i was at a conference in new york of many groups interested in religious literacy including many foundations talking about how to improve it and we all agree it is a serious issue. if we are going to live with our differences we have to know more about one another. it is a religious freedom issue. if you don't teach young people about their neighbors we are not going to live well together in the future. in tolerance and hate is grounded in ignorance so we have got to do better. there's only one required religion in the united states in public school but i know about and i would note there is any more and that is in modesto, california and i helped them get that going after a conflict they had. they have done really well. all ninth graders take world religion for a semester and it has been fine. the religious community supported in modesto but there are many world religions electives proliferating. fairfax county has the 11 and maryland has quite a few. not many districts have a lot of world religion electi
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 11:00pm EDT
-span. >> at their annual conference, the religion news writers association hosted a discussion about the first amendment and religious freedom. panelists from the aclu, conference of catholic airships, the museum's first amendment center looked at religion in schools, same-sex marriage and the contraception mandate in the new health care law. >> is the song? okay. hello, everybody, welcome. i'm michelle. so, let's get started. covering religion in america means writing about tensions about religious freedom. what does that mean? how far does it go? and who gets it. when i started this nearly eight years ago, i was talking about stephen's book on religious literacy and how to legally break religion more into public schools. the last couple years we have all written a bit about divisions over islam and measures are in the country to limit the use of sharia law and offers to stop mosques from being built. in the past year, we have all reported on the standoff between the american catholic bishops in the white house over the new health care laws mandate for employers to these access to contraception in diff
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 9:00am EDT
observer of american politics, and culture, and also a thoughtful skull on issues of religion and culture and politics, and a seasoned observer of arab politics and with these two gentlemen as our assistance today, we will be able to take a broader look at how the arab world are looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so i'm grateful to all of you for coming. i look forward to our discussion. and at this point i'd like to invite shibley telhami up to the podium to present. >> thanks a lot, tammy. it's only good to be here. i'm going to just present, not the whole thing by some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation, i will present the highlights but i just want to give you a bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks, 700, sample, 737, that is designed to be national representative. it's an internet panel. the methodologies described in the information that will put out is also available online. i also
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 11:00pm EDT
freedom of religion in the right of government to regulate society, even when such regulations may interfere with religious doctrine because i think those are two points that are important here. there was a time in this country before 1965, when it was okay for a state to outlaw contraception spanner couples. several states had them for years. they were on the books lingering on the books for years and finally the supreme court in a case called griswold versus connecticut says it is unconstitutional to prohibit married people from using contraception in the privacy of their bedroom. does the constitution have a provision that says government shall not prohibit married people from using contraception in their bedroom? no, it does not. it does have something called due process and within due process accords eventually found there was a right of privacy. and for my libertarian friends in the crowd, a name something you've been seeing for years, which is the government needs to get out of our life to the extent possible and we don't want the government to regulate what we do with our m
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00pm EDT
the to religion as well as to education and the politics. that is why president obama is not embarrassed to say, as he says in his second book, the audacity of hope, that he believes a living constitution. the phrase, and to a large extent the idea come from wilson . that turn sounds so green, so natural, so organic. one of those averments the laws that republicans are always opposing. that's a deliberate distraction. a living constitution, the principle of the constitution is not natural selection but artificial selection. the theory is are the reasoning is we have a call to the point where we can control our own evolution, we can take charge of society's development as a whole , so the living constitution, as they both, i think, would describe it, is really a mandate for experts to take charge of government, to experiment on the sovereign people rather than simply represent them, to build a new state and breed, as it were, a new people. it is constitutional eugenics. amid that seem a -- flex of a living constitution unless changes the law of light, it is puzzling and revealing to discover tha
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
don't believe that it's ever been a belief in religion. this is what i'm going to say that the christian part of barack obama's history made him did not have. another save you some of them. i believe he's christian. i have been to his church and i believe that is what he believes in. as christian and i converted to islam because i felt for women it is more protected because of their traditional role of father and mother in the home with her mother was allowed to be at home and have children with protection of the father. i thought i was a positive situation for me. it takes women off welfare and we don't have that game situation in prison situation that we would have here. but israel, i don't think we should follow their lead because i think the world looks at how americans get along with each other, not how israel gets along with america. israel's approach and the religion is an eye for an eye. they do not follow the christian approach. so when things happen to them in the international war, i feel that followed i for an eye and american doesn't follow that actually t
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 5:00pm EDT
is the congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or the free exercise and stay out of it and leave people alone when it comes to their religion obviously assumes the religion. they believe in god. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a unde
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 7:00pm EDT
to ruthlessly to religion as well as to education and to politics. that's why president obama is not embarrassed to say as he says in the second book, the awe disty of hope, he believes in the living constitution. the phrase to a large extend the idea come from wilson. the term sounds so green, so natural, so organic like one of those environmental laws republicans are always opposing according to the democrats. that's a district misdestruction. the living constitution that president obama and wilson salute, the principle of the constitution is not natural selection but artificial selection. the theory or the reasons is we evolve to the point where question control our own evolution. we can take charge of society's development as a whole. the living constitutionist, as they both, i think, would describe it is a mandate for experts to take charge of government. to experiment on the sovereign people rather than simply represent them to build a new state and bread as a new people. it is constitutional you -- in which change is the law of life in all constitutions are supposed to be subject to darwi
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:00am EDT
in the back of the magazine, from medicine or the arts or lifestyle or religion, did a lot of reporting as did the women in the business section because new york was the financial capital of the world. so we got to be reporting in addition to the fact checking. and it was a very collegial place. we were good friends with the writers and reporters. it was a patriarchal place. it was run by men, and the man at the top, osborn elliott, had this -- we're all on first name so we called him on his come had the veneer of being equal even though we weren't. but it felt very sort of collegial. and, of course, in the midst when i got there, the sex revolution was happening. there was a lot of sex at "newsweek," sometimes mutual. it was a great job to have. so in the late '60s, around 60, 69 the women's movement was starting to gain steam. we were reading about it, some of the women work in consciousness raising groups. i was to cover means of radical women, the red stockings group would only talk to women reporters so i was reporting on them. we suddenly begin to realize that this didn't just apply to t
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00am EDT
. a civil disobedience, we studied the great religion of the world, we studied for what dr. martin luther king, jr. was all about and we were ready and we would be standing and at the theater were going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten. but we didn't strike back as a way of living in a way of life that is better to love than to hate. we wanted to build a love of community and be reconciled so this book is also about reconciliation to give you one example. i first came to washington, d.c. the first, 1961 to go on something called the freedom ride. 13 of us, seven white and 14 african-american. we came here on may 1st and studied and participated in non-violent workshops and i will lover frigate on the night of may 3rd someplace in downtown rest pete -- washington we went into a restaurant and i had never been to a chinese restaurant or had a meal at a chinese restaurant. that night we had a wonderful meal. the food was good, and someone said you should eat well because this might be like the last supper. the next day, may 4th, 1961, we left washington driven from here on our way to
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 5:45am EDT
regime which controls every aspect of their love -- lives even whether they are get to eat. religion is banned, there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment. punishment that it needed out to three generations of person's family. a political offender knows that with he goes to prison, his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today, and more than a million perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this is and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans who have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best effort of the kim family regime to keep it secret. for more than fifty years, ever since the end of the korean war, they have within saled off from the world's eyes. the kim family regime pursued an eyelationist policy and mains an iron grip on information. access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the gov
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 3:00pm EDT
and not to judge people by their religion, their skin color, their financial status, anything like that, with the acceptance of who they are. the world is only this big and that's how it is, because that's how you were taught. if we were so fast to judge one another, not really getting to know each other for what we are. i definitely did something that we cannot take two and listen to. [applause] part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and develop our team. because this is a group of guys about how my brothers. these guys don't ever ask about personalities or anything like that. they just put you in there and expect to get along. i was the only every 10 men of the group. so i didn't really care about it all, all the details, but i'm so excited i got to learn about afghanistan go there. what i learned is that these guys are the most important people in my life. we were there to support and care for each other. it didn't take a long time before the personality differences melted away. my pool team sacrificed their lives. we were running a mission and they took me out and rep
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 5:00pm EDT
read the bible and the language, leaving aside the religion, just for the sake of the words that it used in the king james translation, first of all, it is fabulously well-written and secondly, so many of those phrases have entered into all of our minds, all of us, whether we have ever read the bible are not. we know those phrases and reuse them. and so, i think i am probably other -- every other writer has been influenced by the king james translation, more than any other. what i like to do when i come to manhattan, well actually it's the same as what i'd like to do in london. i like to go to restaurants with my friends. [laughter] >> hi. my name is bob. i read the eye of the needle and on pins and needles and i thought they were both superb especially the one about iran. your comment about lloyd george and communism, have you come across any similar commerce agents between franco and hitler as to why franco did not declare war on the allies after having accepted so much aid from the nazis and if so, could you put me in a direction? >> no, have never come across such a conv
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2012 8:00pm EDT
both to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how your religion played a part in that, and, please, this is such an emotional issue for so many people many this country -- ryan: sure. >> moderator: please talk personally about this, if you could. congressman ryan. ryan: i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. my faith informs me about how to take care of the vulnerable, of how to make sure that people have a chance in life. now, you want to ask, basically, why i'm pro-life? it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course. but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about ten-and-a-half years ago my wife jana and i went to mercy hospital in janesville where i was born for our seven week ultrasound for our first born child. and we saw that heartbeat. our little baby was in the shape of a bean, and to this day we have nicknamed our first bor
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30pm EDT
religions and what's the extent of the space and hostility among the religions, how are matchal resources distributed -- natural resources distributed. it's generally not a good idea for all of the resources to be found only in one part of a large country. and things like that. so i don't want to overestimate the importance of constitutions or, therefore, to say, well, here's a constitution that's really worked because, no doubt, there would be examples when it didn't. let me be truly heretical and say that one of the things i like about many state constitutions -- and you find these especially as you move west, but not only in the west -- is the degree to can they allow some element of direct democracy. the united states constitution, 1787, was written by people who, not to put too fine a point on it, were fundamentally mistrustful to their core of democracy. james madison writes very proudly in the 63rd federalists that although the constitution is ordained in the name of we the people, that will be the last time the people speak more or less directly. otherwise they will speak exclusiv
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 6:00am EDT
connected still. so, religion is very much a part of our everyday lives, and in our communities and who we are as people but we still have persecution for our religious practices. you mentioned that in the book. one of the phone calls we get is those people incarcerated for prison our military limited in their ability to practice religion. what are those challenges? >> guest: i think it is a real issue. the first kind of disclaimer to cut out there for people is there's so much diversity in indian country and the traditions even for example for red lake reservation in minnesota one of the villages has never had a church or a mission, 100% traditional beliefs, kunin practice they bury their dead in the front yard it changes things. you step out the door and there's bad, brand mauney and grandpa. doesn't make it hard to sell the family farm and go to california so that connection to place is really deep and a lot of native people. on the same reservation, across the lake at the village of red lake there is a catholic mission in the church. the population is predominantly catholic those are t
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2012 12:00pm EDT
, what i did find is that the recruiting is not driven by the u.s. truck strike, ideology or religion, that even a driven by a notion of clothes and hot. in a region that is cut off from the west of the world were people living on less than 800 calories a day that makes a real difference. economic deprivation and a real concern about government corruption is pulling people into the insurgency, not u.s. throws strikes or global ideology. all of those things are subsequently used as the indoctrination process. subsequently used to legitimize and mobilize and prepare their message to the broader world. that's not what is actually bringing 18, 19, 200 kids. the second thing is overwhelmingly they resent the does tracks. they resent the draws tracks of the national sovereignty grounds to national pride grounds, but they also resent them because they have the image that the drones and that the u.s. government is standing up a government that is not accountable to them. we hear this over and over. it did not matter what i was talking to. this notion that the u.s. is propping up a government
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 9:00am EDT
, the issue of the role of religion and secular and so on is still there in algeria. and there is a statement which is presently, to me, when he says, he talks about the pgd, and he talks about the regime. it's like the pgd is something, and the regime is something else. it's like pgd is the government, and the government is part of the regime in my sense. so what is the story? it's like the pgd is something outside of the regime, and then the monarchy is something else. but what i see is really the secularists and t non non seq. lahrists. it's like the pgd is the -- [inaudible] of the islamists, few yo like. >> okay. thank you very much. why don't we start with anwr, and then we'll have a few more minutes just to wrap up. >> sure. because the new constitution, as i said, it's still ambiguous. so the prime or the head of government still, you know, he has some powers, but there's still interpretation of what that power means. so in that there are differences between the pgd, pgd is true it's a party in power. it does not control, obviously, the government. it's only one among many. so it does
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 9:00am EDT
understanding of science, and when doesn't have to start about religion in a traditional sense. hand being forces larger than you, one of the great feelings of life. >> host: you get the question about faith versus technology? >> i get a lot in "the invention of air: a story of science, faith, revolution, and the birth of america". i don't get it quite as much. the technology version of this, a lot of technology futures the lead in the singularity that we are heading towards a point where machine intelligence and exceeds intelligence. and we lose control of the machines on some level. this is dystopian idea, in the terminator movies or utopian idea where finally there will be things smarter than humans that will be able, and that is the rhapsody. i get into that more. >> host: steven johnson is our guest and we have in our laps on at the 11 lebron in ohio, you are on. >> it is a pleasure to speak with you. if i could divert my attention for a moment. and your professionalism and tv rescues, and my appreciation, if you wouldn't mind. would you mind speaking on your work ethic. the you have
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 11:00pm EDT
african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation strategy at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote: what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v. wade? later that year applying for a promotion he wrote: i am particularly proud of my contributions to recent cases in which the government has argued in the supreme court that the constitution does not protect the right to an abortion. samuel alito then, samuel alito now. but the republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either, and we saw that in re began's nominations to the -- reagan's nominations to the supreme court. 1981, pott
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 8:00pm EDT
that has ever been a belief in religion. but this time i'm going to say, too, the christian part of her obama's history. they made him denounce fatter than they say he is a muslim. i believe he's christian. i've been to his church. and i believe that is what he believes in and i was christian and i converted to islam because i fell for women because it was more protective of their traditional roles of father and mother were the mother was allowed to be at home and have children with a protection of the father. and i thought it was a very positive situation for democracy. israel, i don't think we should follow their lead. they do not follow the christian approach. when things happen to them, i believe that's going to be a problem for americans in the future and we need to make their own decisions, even if israel says they are going to withdraw their support from all of these things because i think they are divine people and i think that his religious falsehood and i feel that americans do not have to follow that abraham was for all people and he was for all peoples children. >> host: wha
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 8:00pm EDT
in art, it is more personal, mo prayer than in the politics, religion, preference. it is just something that goes to the very soul when you say, you bought that? >> this is the first parish church in new brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of "uncle tom's cabin" that in many ways the story began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23. teachers do, by her account, sought a vision of uncle tom being with to death. now, uncle tom is you probably know, is the title charactercome to hear of her 1852 novel, "uncle tom's cabin." "uncle tom's cabin" was written very much as a protest novel to the slave block of which mandated in 1850 that anyone in the north, where of the abolitionists live, if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. and this was the bill that was seen as kind of a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. it said that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say the same, i am a person can hear you beecher stowe, name against slavery as a much of new england.
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 11:00pm EDT
't have any type of insulting to anything that has to do with religion in the country or whatnot. the structures they want to impose in society that people are not really going to go for that, and they are not going to be able to also -- the religious side, people want -- they want economic progress, people want jobs, end to corruption. they want more responsive governments for the society. that's not going to happen because you don't get that with democracy. you need a complete change in the way people think. you have to move from traditionalism to modernity. you put a thin layer over traditionalism. .. spur national sentiments and feelings that the americans want to keep you under the site and have no respect to for you. egypt is the greatest ally. every sin the astronauts of the 1972 war, when henry kissinger went to seize the.answer.both a map on the table and said the israelis on the side of forces and we will able to move our forces here. that is the beginning of an american egyptian relationship. >> in a sense, there is a defense treaty. >> a quick provost for camp david a
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2012 9:00am EDT
, this video is terrible but we've got to be, you know, we have to be respectful of all religions. although quite frankly, i have not heard the administration come out and say that those who abuse buddhist temples, burn sikh temples, abuse jewish history, persecute christians should also be held equally accountable. i have not heard that. this was really a teachable moment by the way. this was a time when mr. obama could have said look, what this video is about is wrong, but guess what? there are things that are being done in the muslim world that are also wrong and islamic speakers don't speak out. their leaders don't speak out. the mullahs don't speak a. not loudly enough. not enough of them. there are many courageous want to do but certainly not enough of them. but this wasn't about the video at all. that's the whole point. it was about al qaeda. and that has come up. that's coming out in the testimony this more. it's come out before already. but the administration did not want to admit it was al qaeda, because that would mean we are not destroyed al qaeda. i don't care if it's al qaeda
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 6:00am EDT
textbooks and the curriculum were silent about religion. thanks to a lot of changes particularly consensus guidelines i talked about teaching about religion snout is in the standards particularly in social studies from. we did a study of state standards a number of years ago and found religion is treated
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)